Assessment Criteria

Assessment Criteria used for marking:

  • Evidence of creative solution development, as exampled by iterative design development.
  • Evidence of personal and group research as a part of project outcomes.
  • How successfully a project is realised in comparison to what was conceptually presented.
  • Level of outside class, in lab & group, engagement.

Learning Outcomes & Graduate Attributes assessed in this task:

    • Openness to ideas and experiences, and a heightened understanding of your own creative potential, and ways of exploring and applying it.
    • Competency in technologies appropriate to design practice.
    • Skills required for self-directed and reflective learning, and the ability to conduct appropriate research.

Feedback strategy: verbal and in-class

UNSW : Graduate Attributes:

COFA : Graduate Attributes:

Definitions

Research: Refers to the collection of data from both primary and secondary sources that will enable you to make informed decisions throughout your projects. Research is an activity that should occur throughout the project/s and be evidenced through original drawings, sketches, photographs, models, articles, readings and other specified information. Research may also be about particular materials and their function and context. It is important to note that it is not the amount of research you accumulate its what you do with the new knowledge. In other words you need to demonstrate and evaluate this research within the project. This also implies a level of critical thinking.

Concept: A concept informs your ideas to the project/s. A good concept will be appropriate to the brief, display innovation and demonstrate a level of viability in relation to social cultural philosophical and ethical considerations. Concepts allow you articulate your creative ideas and test them against a set of criteria.

Design Development: Refers to your ability to extrapolate upon your concept integrating materials and function, appropriate detailing with documentation that demonstrates your understanding of working drawings and model making. Your designs should demonstrate a level of refinement and articulation.

Design synthesis and presentation: Refers to the clarity and integration of communication from research, concept, design development and final outcome.  Your design process and level of professional focus will also be reviewed.

The course assessment strategies have been developed to help you develop skills across a range of interactive media types and interface designs. The skills developed will give you a foundation in digital interactive design practice with particular emphasis on locating and evaluating appropriate information, engaging in creative problem solving and using appropriate software for the project at hand.

The assessment is based on the two projects (80%), the quality and completion of the in class tutorials (20%). Feedback for projects will be primarily qualitative and verbal, but grades will also be given.

Project 1

  • Due: in-class week 7           

Weighting:       40%

Assessment Criteria used for marking:

  • Evidence of personal and/or group research as a part of project presentation.
  • Evidence of creative solution development, as exampled by iterative design development.
  • Demonstrates a design engagement with the possibilities of visual/media programming.
  • How successfully a project is realised in comparison to what was conceptually presented.

Learning Outcomes & Graduate Attributes assessed in this task:

    • The ability to use new technologies to enhance communication in a range of ways by gaining an understanding of the nature of programmable environments and applying this knowledge in your assessment tasks.
    • Able to apply their knowledge and skills to solving problems
    • Competency in technologies appropriate to design practice.
    • Capable of independent, self-directed practice

Feedback strategy: verbal with the possibility of written points.

Project 2

  • Due: in-class week 13         

Weighting:       40%

Assessment Criteria used for marking:

  • Evidence of personal and/or group research as a part of project presentation.
  • Evidence of creative solution development, as exampled by iterative design development.
  • Demonstrates a design engagement with the possibilities of visual/media programming.
  • How successfully a project is realised in comparison to what was conceptually presented.

Learning Outcomes & Graduate Attributes assessed in this task:

    • The ability to use new technologies to enhance communication in a range of ways by gaining an understanding of the nature of programmable environments and applying this knowledge in your assessment tasks.
    • Able to apply their knowledge and skills to solving problems
    • Competency in technologies appropriate to design practice.
    • Capable of independent, self-directed practice

Feedback strategy: verbal with the possibility of written points.

 

Attendance and submission of assignments

This subject involves assessable class exercises therefore it is important that you attend all tutorials and come equipped with design materials.  Lecture input and essential information will normally be provided at the beginning of class time.
Full and punctual attendance is required for this subject.  It is UNSW policy that a student attending less than 80 percent of timetabled classes may be refused assessment.
Work that is submitted late without a satisfactory reason (e.g. documented medical or compassionate reasons) may only be considered for a pass level mark. Work submitted after other students' work has been marked and returned will not be accepted for marking at all. If you are unable to submit work on the due date it is important that you tell your lecturer and discuss arrangements for submitting as soon as possible ‑ do not leave it to the following week.

 

Workload expectations

It is expected that you will spend at least 8-9 hours per week studying in addition to lecture/studio/lab time.  This time should be made up of reading, research, working on projects and problems, performing class tasks and attending classes.  In periods where you need to complete assignments or prepare for examinations the workload may be greater.
Over commitment has been a cause of failure for many students.  You should take the required workload into account when planning how to balance study with employment and other activities.

Academic misconduct

UNSW rules on Academic Misconduct: Academic misconduct is defined as a breach of rules relating to academic conduct as prescribed by the University and Faculty rules. Academic misconduct includes actions such as taking unauthorised materials into examinations; impersonation in examinations; permitting another student to copy answers in an examination; improperly obtaining prior knowledge of an examination paper and using it in an examination.
Other examples of academic misconduct include misconduct concerning academic works such as failing to acknowledge the source of material in an assignment, plagiarism or submitting work for assessment knowing it to be the work of another person. Rules regarding misconduct are fully specified in the UNSW Undergraduate handbook and students are advised to be fully cognisant of the rules governing misconduct.

 

Plagiarism is the presentation of the thoughts or work of another as one’s own.* Examples include:

Direct duplication of the thoughts or work of another, including by copying work, or knowingly permitting it to be copied.  This includes copying material, ideas or concepts from a book, article, report or other written document (whether published or unpublished), composition, artwork, design, drawing, circuitry, computer program or software, web site, Internet, other electronic resource, or another person’s assignment without appropriate acknowledgement;

  • paraphrasing another person’s work with very minor changes keeping the meaning, form and/or progression of ideas of the original;
  • piecing together sections of the work of others into a new whole;
  • presenting an assessment item as independent work when it has been produced in whole or part in collusion with other people, for example, another student or a tutor; and,
  • claiming credit for a proportion a work contributed to a group assessment item that is greater than that actually contributed.†

Submitting an assessment item that has already been submitted for academic credit elsewhere may also be considered plagiarism.

The inclusion of the thoughts or work of another with attribution appropriate to the academic discipline does not amount to plagiarism.

Students are reminded of their Rights and Responsibilities in respect of plagiarism, as set out in the University Undergraduate and Postgraduate Handbooks, and are encouraged to seek advice from academic staff whenever necessary to ensure they avoid plagiarism in all its forms.

The Learning Centre website is the central University online resource for staff and student information on plagiarism and academic honesty.  It can be located at:

www.lc.unsw.edu.au/plagiarism

The Learning Centre also provides substantial educational written materials, workshops, and tutorials to aid students, for example, in:

  • Correct referencing practices;
  • Paraphrasing, summarising, essay writing, and time management;
  • Appropriate use of, and attribution for, a range of materials including text, images, formulae and concepts.

Individual assistance is available on request from The Learning Centre.

Students are also reminded that careful time management is an important part of study and one of the identified causes of plagiarism is poor time management.  Students should allow sufficient time for research, drafting, and the proper referencing of sources in preparing all assessment items.

* Based on that proposed to the University of Newcastle by the St James Ethics Centre.  Used with kind permission from the University of Newcastle.
† Adapted with kind permission from the University of Melbourne.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical computing interaction Design

Processing + Arduino

Sensor & components

Essential Viewing

Lectures